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I don’t think love is always a huge, cataclysmal emotional event. I think sometimes it sits in front of you for a very long time until you glance over and say, oh, there you are. I don’t think it’s your saving grace. I think it’s the hand that you hold while you save yourself. I don’t think it’s someone who sweeps you off your feet. I think it’s someone who stays right beside you and lets you walk on your own. I don’t think it’s always a blazing but temporary insanity of racing hearts and hormones. I think that’s the love that changes us. The love that should stay with us is the calm, deep, thorough knowing that you want to be with someone despite logical objections. And what may be even more important than anything is that I think you find your own love at the very edges of where other people’s love pushes you.
Of course, you never really forget anyone, but you certainly release them. You stop allowing their history to have any meaning for you today. You let them change their haircut, let them move, let them fall in love again. And when you see this person you have let go, you realize that there is no reason to be sad. The person you knew exists somewhere, but you are separated by too much time to reach them again.
Chelsea Fagan, How We Let People Go (via 366quotes)
I have observed that male writers tend to get asked what they think and women what they feel. In my experience…all of the questions coming at [women writers] from interviewers tend to be about how lucky they are to be where they are – about luck and identity and how the idea struck them. The interviews much more seldom engage with the woman as a serious thinker, a philosopher, as a person with preoccupations that are going to sustain them for their lifetime.
blastedheath:


laclefdescoeurs
Helmer Osslund (Swedish, 1866-1938), Summer day, Ljungan. Paper on paper-panel, 35 x 28 cm.

blastedheath:

laclefdescoeurs

Helmer Osslund (Swedish, 1866-1938), Summer day, Ljungan. Paper on paper-panel, 35 x 28 cm.

geoffreystein:

She, oil on acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36 in, 2012.

geoffreystein:

She, oil on acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36 in, 2012.

deadsymmetry:

Tadeusz Boruta - W Otchłani (2002)

deadsymmetry:

Tadeusz Boruta - W Otchłani (2002)

Immediately after lunch I will write you
a letter telling you I drew your face
and hung it on my wall. Good morning you,
I say. In my best cursive I will also tell you
that at night I love when I turn over
and you are not moving; a potato.
Sometimes it is so cold I want to freak out.
You blow hot into my ear.
My face is drowning. Your hands are a net.
Francesca Chabrier (via celle-ci)

Félix Vallotton, Nu couché sur un tapis rouge [détail], 1909

Félix Vallotton, Nu couché sur un tapis rouge [détail], 1909

wetreesinart:


Neil Welliver (Am. 1929-2005), Old Windfall, 1982,  huile sur toile
 

wetreesinart:

Neil Welliver (Am. 1929-2005), Old Windfall, 1982,  huile sur toile

 

ducksofrubber:

vasquez rocks
check out some photos here!

ducksofrubber:

vasquez rocks

check out some photos here!

From the wound to the wound.
Edmond Jabès, from The Book of Margins, trans. Rosmarie Waldrop (via proustitute)